Mahashweta: Sudha Murthy

I was looking for a book to read with not more than 150 page or so. Mahashweta fit the bill. But I was not prepared for what was to come. Today when I put the book down I feel that I have lost a friend. So attached did I get to the protagonist that, I feel sheContinue reading “Mahashweta: Sudha Murthy”

Her Father’s Daughter: Shekhar Mehra

The blurb at the back of the book completely belies what lies inside 215 pages novel. I was taken unaware when I finished the book, waiting to let it all sink in. the blurb reads: ” When a girl child is born into the zamindar family of a village called Veerganj, she brings no cheerContinue reading “Her Father’s Daughter: Shekhar Mehra”

Dog Boy: Eva Hornung

This was unlike any book I have ever read. After my first reading I was left aghast, as to how a child could be left to fend on his own. It took me a while to re read this one since the imagery had left such an impact, that the moment I held the bookContinue reading “Dog Boy: Eva Hornung”

Dahan: Suchitra Bhattacharya, Debjani Sengupta (Editor), Mahua Mitra (Translator)

As a literature student I have been exposed to many books that speak of atrocities against women. But few have struck a chord when it comes to Indian  writing. On a vacation I happened to read the much acclaimed novel Dahan by Suchitra Bhattacharya. Being a fan of Bengali literature I picked up this book while surfing for aContinue reading “Dahan: Suchitra Bhattacharya, Debjani Sengupta (Editor), Mahua Mitra (Translator)”

Sunflowers of the Dark: Krishna Sobti: translated by Pamela Manasi

Katha has always offered a wide array of literature through translated works. I recently finished reading Krishna Sobti’s ‘Memory’s Daughter’. And the after effects are that I am drawn to books by the author. So I managed to lay my hands on another masterpiece, “Sunflowers of the Dark”. The title of the book is enigmatic,Continue reading “Sunflowers of the Dark: Krishna Sobti: translated by Pamela Manasi”

Parineeta by Sarat Chandra Chattopadhyay(Translated by Malobika Chaudhari)

After having finished reading Munshi Premchand’s “Nirmala”, I found myself drawn to read literature that were set in India before independence. Yes we have read much in our History books, but the real depiction of the times can be best seen in the literature where writers were bound by that shackles of the society andContinue reading “Parineeta by Sarat Chandra Chattopadhyay(Translated by Malobika Chaudhari)”